A Fun Run
1 min read

A Fun Run

My brother invited me to go on a run. As we climbed the first hill on a gravel road south of Lake Minnewaska, through a cathedral of trees, he shared his observations on my posture, cadence, technique, breathing.
A Fun Run

When was the last time you had fun?

No, I mean really, really had fun?

Well, for me, it was over Memorial Day Weekend.

My brother invited me to go on a run. As we climbed the first hill on a gravel road south of Lake Minnewaska, through a cathedral of trees, he shared his observations on my posture, cadence, technique, breathing. I tried what he suggested. The running was smoother each time, more effortless (even though I was breathing, and boy did I feel—at moments—to be fatiguing).

When we paused to stretch, I asked him about his long training sessions, preparing for triathlons and ironmans and gravel rides. He said, in my summation: you learn to be one with your emotions. That is, to be there with them, versus in a reactive state. If you succumb to the lows or the highs, you could make a mistake.

At times he ran in front of me. My leg movement fell right in step with his cadence. We were brothers, running. Like tribemates on a hunt. By then, we'd come out of the trees. Cars whizzed by on the highway. We ran. We took in the planted hills, nooks, streams, and forest garlanding the lake hundreds of feet below.

We eventually ran almost an hour.

But it felt like no time at all.

Isn't it interesting how the activities that matter most distort our sense of time. (Could time really be an illusion?)

Okay, one last question: Have you gotten your run in today?

If you want more on running, and maybe to learn (intellectually, at least), how I fell in sync with my brother, when he took the lead, try this book:

Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen

My brother recommends it.

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